Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 3218 THE VALUEOF A LIFETIME One of the most important roles of the Association is to educate stakeholders about the tremendous value of the medical technology industry to patients, health care systems and the economy. Our industry is creating life-saving and life-improving innovations every day that help patients live longer, healthier lives while reducing health care costs and creating good- paying jobs across America and around the world. AdvaMed’s Life Changing Innovation campaign is the medtech industry’s flagship communications program to share our value story with the public, including policymakers, elected officials, patient and provider groups, and others, to help shape policies critical to our success. L I F E C H A N G I N G I N N O VA T I O N Bill Walton, NBA hall of famer and back surgery patient, shares his perspective on life changing innovation with attendees of AdvaMed 2015. Caroll Neubauer, chairman and CEO of B. Braun Medical (at right), hosts an LCI employee engagement event in May at the company’s Bethlehem, Pennsylvania facility, alongside AdvaMed’s Don May, executive vice president, payment and health care delivery policy. Flyers and ads featuring patients and allied organizations supporting repeal of the device tax helped AdvaMed secure device tax relief in 2015. Dusty Donaldson is a cancer survivor and the founder of the Dusty Joy Foundation, whose mission is advancing lung cancer awareness, early detection and compassion for people impacted by lung cancer. Dusty’s cancer was caught early thanks to a CT scan which discovered a five-centimeter tumor in her right lung. She had two-thirds of that lung removed and received chemotherapy. After treatment, her oncologist said three words few lung cancer patients hear: “You are cured.” September 2015 will mark her 10 year “cancerversary.” High Point, North Carolina Support medical innovation Repeal the device tax Someone you know is counting on research and development to bring to life the next breakthrough in medical progress. With an aging population, people with disabilities living longer lives, and chronic disease rates growing at faster rates, now is the time for more—not less—resources to advance cures and treatments that help people live healthier, longer, and more independent lives. That’s why patients, patient advocates, leading voices in the disability community, and research organizations oppose the medical device tax. Taxing medical innovation doesn’t make sense, but helping people recover and get back to their home, family, or job does. “Access to medical imaging saved my life. I am now advocating for the thousands of patients who face cancer and other life- threatening diseases without access to the most advanced diagnostic equipment and innovative medical solutions. One obvious obstacle to patient access is the medical device tax, which thwarts research and development and delays progress of new life-saving technologies.” I support medical innovation Dusty Donaldson Mike Kukla is an engineer who led a very active life prior to being diagnosed with stage 4 colon cancer. He ran a 5 or 10K every weekend and enjoyed competing in obstacle course races. One day after a hike, the pain in his stomach was so severe that he ended up in the ER where he was ultimately diagnosed with cancer through a colonoscopy. Mike received lifesaving surgery via a laparoscopic procedure which minimized recoverytime.HealsoreceivedSelectiveInternal Radiation Therapy (SIRT), a new innovative treatment of liver metastasis in which the adjacent tissue is spared from excess radiation because it is more targeted and injected directly into the Hepatic artery. The laparoscopic procedure combined with state-of-the-art SIRT saved Mike’s life and added years to what otherwise might be a very grim prognosis. That was almost 3 years ago. Hillsboro, Oregon Support medical innovation Repeal the device tax Someone you know is counting on research and development to bring to life the next breakthrough in medical progress. With an aging population, people with disabilities living longer lives, and chronic disease rates growing at faster rates, now is the time for more—not less—resources to advance cures and treatments that help people live healthier, longer, and more independent lives. That’s why patients, patient advocates, leading voices in the disability community, and research organizations oppose the medical device tax. Taxing medical innovation doesn’t make sense, but helping people recover and get back to their home, family, or job does. “I support repealing the medical device tax because the impact on R&D budgets, especially start-ups, is unsustainable and limits innovation. Thanks to cutting-edge imaging and radiation therapy technologies, I am almost 3 years into my battle with stage 4 cancer. I continue to work full-time, compete in the occasional 5k, and go on hikes with my dog.” I support medical innovation Mike Kukla Erika Hanson Brown is the founder and mayor of COLONTOWN, a non-profit which builds communities of survivors of gastrointestinal diseases. She’ll never forget the day she was diagnosed with late-stage colon cancer through a colonoscopy. She thought it was a death sentence but was determined not to let the disease win. The next day, a computed tomography (CT) scan revealed the approximate size of the tumor and showed possible signs of cancer of the liver and spleen. Erika underwent surgery, in which a team of doctors “redesigned” her colon, removing the tumor, her spleen, and 12 lymph nodes. After six months of chemotherapy, her cancer was in remission. Now, more than 12 years after her diagnosis, Erika is considered “NED” (no evidence of disease) and continues to advocate for the millions of other patients diagnosed each day. Denver, Colorado Support medical innovation Repeal the device tax Someone you know is counting on research and development to bring to life the next breakthrough in medical progress. With an aging population, people with disabilities living longer lives, and chronic disease rates growing at faster rates, now is the time for more—not less—resources to advance cures and treatments that help people live healthier, longer, and more independent lives. That’s why patients, patient advocates, leading voices in the disability community, and research organizations oppose the medical device tax. Taxing medical innovation doesn’t make sense, but helping people recover and get back to their home, family, or job does. “As a cancer survivor who has personally benefited from medical imaging technology, I can tell you that what we really need to do is forget about politics and look at the patients who are adversely affected by the tax. The impact of this devastating tax on investments in R&D threatens the quality of life for patients across the country.” I support medical innovation Erika Hanson Brown Mark Judge is a father, who was first diagnosed with colon cancer in January 2013 after a pre- test for rotator cuff surgery showed unusually low iron levels in his blood. With no family history of cancer, and no major illness up to that point, he wasn’t a typical candidate for a colonoscopy, but going with his doctor’s recommendation, the test found a stage 3b tumor in his colon. Mark has gone through radiation, several surgeries, and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. With each surgery and every new chemo treatment, he receives either a positron emission tomography (PET) scan or a computed tomography (CT) scan to monitor his progress. Without these scans, Mark and his doctors would have no knowledge of what the cancer is doing inside his body and how it is responding to various forms of treatment. Despite a poor initial prognosis, Mark is hopeful that continued access to the latest medical imaging technologies will help guide future treatments and prolong his life. I’m going to continue to fight because of my 11 year old daughter Elly, who is my co-pilot on this journey, and I will not let her down. I need to see her grow up, graduate, and go on to college. Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Support medical innovation Repeal the device tax Someone you know is counting on research and development to bring to life the next breakthrough in medical progress. With an aging population, people with disabilities living longer lives, and chronic disease rates growing at faster rates, now is the time for more—not less—resources to advance cures and treatments that help people live healthier, longer, and more independent lives. That’s why patients, patient advocates, leading voices in the disability community, and research organizations oppose the medical device tax. Taxing medical innovation doesn’t make sense, but helping people recover and get back to their home, family, or job does. “That’s why I fear that the medical device tax, which prevents manufacturers from investing in research and development, will slow the development and introduction of new, life-saving medical technologies, like the ones that are keeping me and millions of other patients alive.” I support medical innovation Mark Judge A D V A M E D 2 0 1 5 A N N U A L R E P O R T