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Contact:
Danielle Blake
202-434-7233
dblake@advamed.org
August 25, 2016

U.S. Rep. Tom Price Joins Atlanta MedTech and Veteran Communities to Discuss Veterans' Contributions to Health Care Industry

ATLANTA – Aug. 25, 2016 – Today, U.S. Representative Tom Price, MD (R-Ga.) and Dunwoody Mayor Denis Shortal joined members of the Georgia medical technology and veteran communities to discuss the importance of working with veterans as they transition to the private sector and the many workplace contributions they can provide. The event took place at the U.S. corporate headquarters of Elekta, and was co-hosted by MVPvets (the MedTech and BioTech Veterans Program), the Southeastern Medical Device Association (SEMDA), and the Advanced Medical Technology Association (AdvaMed).

The event featured:

  • U.S. Rep. Tom Price, MD, (R-Ga.)
  • Denis Shortal, Mayor of Dunwoody (Brig. Gen., USMC, Ret.)
  • Bill Yaeger, executive vice president, Region North America, Elekta (former Marine Corporal)
  • Scott Whitaker, president and CEO, AdvaMed
  • Mike Grice, board of directors, MVPvets (Lt. Col. USMC, Ret.)
  • Rich Ellis, senior vice president of field service, Elekta (former U.S. Army Captain)
  • Pat Mackin, chief executive officer, CryoLife (1st Lt. Army, Ret.)
  • Jason Rupp, executive director, SEMDA

During his remarks, Rep. Price highlighted the need for both the public and private sectors in Georgia and across the country to commit to recruiting and hiring former members of the military in positions that not only effectively leverage their skills, but also offer opportunities to advance in their post-military careers.

“Our obligation to our troops does not end when they leave active duty,” said Congressman Price. "When members of our military – brave men and women who were willing to put their lives on the line for the safety and security of the American people – join the civilian workforce, they should have access to a job market that is ready and eager to embrace their invaluable skills. I’m proud to be a part of recognizing this important effort to support our veterans in the workplace and, specifically, their important contributions to the health care industry.”

Currently, approximately 200,000 men and women transition from military to civilian careers each year. Engineers, information technology specialists, electrical and mechanical technicians are among the top 25 jobs for veterans, according to a recent survey conducted by GIJobs.com. However, veterans with skills in human resources, finance, logistics and the supply chain, among others, are also needed.

During the panel, speakers discussed the robust technical skills and valuable soft skills – like high levels of resiliency and advanced team building – veterans bring to the workplace that make them effective and productive employees. The panelists also highlighted the commitment of the medical technology industry – through programs offered by organizations like MVPvets – to help prospective employers evaluate and match veterans with mentors, jobs and career resources.

“The U.S. medical technology industry has led the world in innovation, quality and manufacturing excellence for decades, due in large part to its drive to serve the common good,” said Mike Grice. “Recruiting our nation’s veterans, who share this commitment and have dedicated their lives to something greater than themselves, is a natural extension of that mission.”

“The life sciences industry is a vibrant contributor to economic development in the U.S., and medical technology companies in particular provide uniquely challenging, stimulating and meaningful careers for people with military backgrounds. Elekta is a proud employer of veterans and active reserve duty military personnel, with 80 percent of our engineering and technical positions held by veterans, in addition to a number of executive level roles,” said Bill Yaeger.  

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